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Compliance Program Best Practices Review of Effectiveness

Monday, April 3rd, 2017

Now Is The Time To Re-Examine Compliance “Best Practices” In Your Organization

Historically, compliance programs have not been per se mandatory.  However, most larger health care organizations have established formal compliance programs to foster an atmosphere of compliance and to take advantage of possible benefits under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines.  The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 has made compliance programs mandatory for many providers.  The exact scope of what type of provider will be required to establish formal compliance programs has not yet been set in stone by the Office of Inspector General.  However, it can probably be expected that most providers will be required to formalize their compliance efforts.

Institutional health care compliance has been growing for well over a decade now.  Compliance is becoming of major importance to health care providers of all nature and size.  The OIG has promoted compliance programs by releasing compliance guidance covering a number of industries, including billing companies, physician practices, hospitals, home health agencies, long term care facilities, ambulatory surgery centers and others.  Smaller providers who have previously not had the establishment of formal compliance programs on their radar will now be required to adopt formal plans.

It is not enough to simply adopt a compliance plan, place it on a shelf, and let it collect dust.  A compliance program requires active monitoring.  There are seven basic elements that are necessary for a compliance program to meet regulatory requirements and the requirements under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines.  The seven primary elements of an effective compliance program include:

  • The establishment of written compliance policies and procedures;
  • The designation of a high ranking individual within the organization to serve as compliance officer;
  • The establishment of an effective training and education program for all levels of personnel;
  • The establishment of effective lines of communication, such as a compliance hotline, to enable individuals within the organization to report compliance breaches;
  • Performing ongoing internal auditing and monitoring
  • The creation of a system that enforces breaches of the compliance program including appropriate discipline and corrective measures
  • The establishment of effective measures to respond to compliance problems that are detected.

An effective compliance program establishes an atmosphere of compliance that permeates the entire organization.  A compliance program should be tailored to the specific circumstances of the provider.  The program should also feed and grow on itself.  As problems are detected appropriate changes should be made to the program and related policies and procedures.

Mandatory compliance programs also highlight the importance of compliance on larger institutions who may have already adopted formal programs.  These institutions should take the signal that compliance is of growing importance.   Providers who have already adopted compliance plans should take the opportunity to dust them off and re-examine the role of compliance within their organization.  Now is the time to increase the focus on compliance and assure that compliance is an active system rather than a written plan that is sitting on the shelf.

John H. Fisher

Health Care Counsel
Ruder Ware, L.L.S.C.
500 First Street, Suite 8000
P.O. Box 8050
Wausau, WI 54402-8050

Tel 715.845.4336
Fax 715.845.2718

Ruder Ware is a member of Meritas Law Firms Worldwide

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